Trump: “You Can Go To Work If You’re Positive”

Donald Trump is an idiot. Self-serving, but still, he manages to even screw that up. In an election year, with a pandemic perhaps days away from being official, he ought to be protecting people. That gets votes. And I’m not talking about the idiot trolls and the stunningly moronic mouth breathers who still think he’s great. Had he ever done one major thing to protect this country, maybe he’d have an ounce of respect from the general public. And even if they’d still hate him, if anyone needs respect, it’s Donald Trump.

But his handling of the Coronavirus is a danger to everyone, starting with his act of putting VP Pence in charge of …. Wait. What’s he in charge of? Because the answer is really “to provide one of many scapegoats should the whole thing blow up in his (Trump’s) face. Which is already happening. Pence is said to have put his secretary in charge. Pence makes former VP Dan Quayle look like an MIT professor.

Nothing can be released to the press by the CDC unless it’s cleared by Pence. Once that was done and people began to mistrust the CDC website (honestly, you can still use it; do you really think experts are going to withhold critical information?), Trump next attacked the NIH and, worse, the World Health Organization, WHO. His latest claim is that the mortality rate for COVID-19 is one percent or less. And he said on Fox News that even if you test positive for the SARS variant, you can still go to work.

First of all, there still isn’t a lot of testing going on. It’s a problem of the test’s availability. The public is suspicious that he’s held back testing kits and the number of cases known. I’d usually call that a conspiracy theory, but with Trump, one never knows until he tells on himself on Twitter, the idiot.

Second, if you do test positive, under no circumstances should you go to work. Or to the corner store, for that matter. You need anything, call a friend, have them pick it up and leave it on your doorstep.

Third, if your employer says to stay home or work from home, do it. If you get disciplined for missing time, you have a viable lawsuit; this one is nothing to take lightly.

And look, I get it. It’s a scary thing. People most at risk of dying from the disease, in particular the elderly and those who have pre-existing conditions, are a real problem. That’s terrifying.

Having a president who tells you lies about it is the same thing as having a parent tell a child it’s safe to play jacks in the middle of the street. The poor kid goes for fivesies one second, and the next, a semi truck has turned him into roadkill. Don’t balk; I’ve known parents like that. For their own peace they encourage a child to play outside. They never see that child again.

Too many people hang on Trump’s every word as they would God’s.

Donald Trump’s misinformation campaign for COVID-19 is dangerous. Not only that, but it’s just more of the same.

He lies about Mexicans being rapists, promises to build a wall and force Mexico to pay for it, then part of it gets blown over by the wind! Just tossing one out here, but I’d bet anyone a bottle of single malt that he saw that it fell toward Mexico and considered blaming Mexicans with chains wrapped around their pickup truck bumpers (I thought it was going to be the “best wall, a beautiful wall, and would be unscalable and unbreakable and beautiful, but there’s nothing true about any of that).

We know he’s told so many lies that on that alone, he was worth impeaching. But when his lies, like the Sharpie extension on a NWS hurricane map that altered the real path of the storm to include Alabama, are actually funny while also being enraging, lies about health and wellness during a crisis constitutes attempted homicide. I say this seriously and with a heavier heart than I’ve had since my son died. Because people who listen to him are going to risk their own lives as well as the lives of others. And that’s not what a president should be doing.

Symptoms of Coronavirus can be mild in one person, even vanishing the next day. That’s got nothing to do with how contagious they are, and every handshake, hug or kiss, or even being in a room with others can, has and will keep the transmission of the virus going. And Trump even says that the Spring and summer will “kill” the virus, but the facts from history don’t support that claim.

PAST PANDEMICS

COVID-19 will do the same thing so many other outbreaks have done in the past: hang out and return in the Fall with a vengeance: it will kill people again. The “Spanish” flu of 1918-1920 did this. It was a global pandemic and got its name because Spain was one of few countries that didn’t censor the spread and mortality that resulted. That made people think Spain was where it began. But did you know that it was an H1N1 virus just like the one we had in 2009? In fact the two outbreaks were the only ones with that in common. We didn’t have worldwide jet travel, but World War One ensured that soldiers returning home helped the spread of the disease around the globe. It killed as many as 100 million people. Andrew Miller, head of the Australian Medical Association has said of COVID-19 that we haven’t seen anything like this since the 1918 Spanish flu.

There’s a similarity between the two viruses: they cause high fever, aches, coughing and can end in pneumonia.

Other than that, there’s no comparing H1N1 with SARS. It has a different set of biomechanics, and is suspected of causing cytokine bursts called “storms”, which is an immune system reaction that’s not really desirable; by itself it can cause high fever, diarrhea, inflammation, and had previously been linked to such conditions as atherosclerosis. I find that last bit to be inscrutable, as the condition is usually caused by diet, genetic predisposition, obesity, blood sugar levels, high cholesterol and sedentary lifestyle.

Will COVID-19 spread and destroy on a scale like Spanish flu? There’s no way to know that yet. I find it likely; with a long incubation period of two weeks, a carrier can certainly spread the infection without even knowing they are sick. By the time of the onset of symptoms, that person could have infected dozens of people or more. One thing is certain, and that is when you do show symptoms, you have to see a doctor to be checked for the disease and your lungs have to be looked at. It’s the pneumonia that makes this respiratory virus so deadly. After that, get your prescription and whatever else you need, go home and stay there. If you get worse, call 911.

Preventative measures include thorough hand washing, and any soap is sufficient. Wash for 25 seconds. Avoid rubbing your eyes or nose. Keep out of crowds, give others six feet of space, no hand shaking, hugging, kissing or sharing drinks or food. Keep your bed clothing and sheets and blankets clean. Wash using hot water and dry on hot temperature setting. Avoid anyone coughing, particularly a dry cough. If you have a cough, cover it. If you have a productive cough, in other words you’re coughing up congestion (sputum), you’re either recovering or reacting to an allergy or cold that caused sinus congestion and drain.

Keep checking in with Doctors and the WHO as well as local news to see if cases are reported nearby.

WHO reports a worldwide shortage of masks. Masks should be worn only if you are sick. Remember that they can only be used once.

And do not trust Donald Trump’s statements. He doesn’t care about you and me. He cares about himself and his image, and he will never learn how to tell us the truth.

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